Divine Motivation

I had this thought the other day on what makes divine classes somewhat superior to the others–you have a backstory and a motivation built right into your class. While everyone else is struggling with moral quandries and identity crises, you get to sit there, smug and content in the knowledge that you are the best at what you do because your god decreed it so. It just doesn’t get any easier than that. Therefore, in the interest of making it just as easy for any other class (we’ll call that “game balance” because it makes me laugh), I created a random table of non-misanthropic and completely justified motivations for your character.

[ROLL A D10]

1. Your god wants it (best if your character has been fairly non-theistic so far — invent new gods, if you can)

2. That [race type] killed / maimed / licked your [family member of choice] (make sure to have a large family to decimate by using this one repeatedly)

3. The cut of his jib was an offense to mine peoples (become a member of as many tribes as possible for full effectiveness)

4. The devil made me do it. (feel free to make up a new devil every time you roll this one)

5. In fact, you can declare yourself under the compulsion of any old thing. It’s the same theory behind divine motivation right? Is there really a big difference between “That rock made me do it” and “Pelor made me do it?”

6. If I don’t complete [insert action], I will turn into a pumpkin at midnight.

7. This? This piece of treasure right here? Why it’s clearly a legendary piece of [VERY IMPORTANT MCGUFFIN] which will save the world!

8. I was given a vision of the future! If I hadn’t done that, there would have been FAR MORE DIRE CONSEQUENCES.

9. The orphans! I did it for the wee orphans!

10. I’d tell you, but then I’d have to kill you.

How about you? What’s the best motivation you’ve found for your characters?


Part idiot. Part old man. All geek. Author and artist for the Vanity Games webcomic (www.vanitygames.com), a retro-futuristic post-apocalytpic romp through a land of broken science and corrputed magic. A lover of all games, tabletop, board, video, or otherwise, and an avid consumer of nerd / pop culture.


Share

About J. J. Sloane

Author and artist for the Vanity Games webcomic (www.vanitygames.com), a retro-futuristic post-apocalytpic romp through a land of broken science and corrputed magic. A lover of all games, tabletop, board, video, or otherwise, and an avid consumer of nerd / pop culture.
Subscribe to Comments RSS Feed in this post

3 Responses

  1. Short blurbs like those options are what I tend to start my character backgrounds with. I have some friends who come to the table with a multiple page back story already written for their character, as wonderful as that is for them, that doesn’t seem to fit me. Maybe you can call it lazy character creation on my part, but I guess I seem to like to discover my character as we play, adding or taking away from the character’s backstory and motivation as the situation presents itself.

    My favorite character in a long time was a dwarven warrior named Ellis. He ended up being highly dexterous when I created him, so I decided from the start that he came from a family of dwarven circus folk, who traveled the lands performing their tricks and feats of skill. But along the way, he became disillusioned with the circus life and began to learn of the mythical stories of historical dwarven adventurers and he set off to make a name of himself and earn honor for his family outside of the circus.

  2. There’s only one motivation any adventurer needs – “It was shiny and I wanted it!”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*
*

© 2018 This is My Game. All rights reserved. XHTML / CSS Valid.
Login Login.